Pet Travel Tips

Pet Travel Tips

GENERAL TRAVEL TIPS:

  • Make sure your pets are up-to-date with their PET TRAVEL TIPSvaccinations,flea, tick and heartworm treatments.
  • Microchip (in addition to collar and tags) – a very important tool to help you locate your pets should they wander during your adventures together. This little rice-grain sized object can help bring them back to you.
  • Pack their bags! Be sure to bring along extra collars, leashes, toys as well as food and water bowls for your pets.
  • Bring extra food, treats – and don’t forget the water. Water content changes from city to city so it’s best to prevent digestive upset and bring bottled water or bottled tap water from home.
  • Locate a veterinary medical provider near your travel destination. Being prepared will give you peace of mind. There are many sources to help you locate a quali ed veterinarian near your destination location. (www.healthypet.com/accreditation/hospitalsearch.aspx)
  • Bring medical records, medications and identification, including pictures of you with your pets.
  • First aid kits are essential in the case of an emergency.
  • Remember, pets don’t belong in hot cars! Heat stroke can be deadly and happens in minutes.

More from the Center for Pet Safety here http://www.centerforpetsafety.org/faqs/pet-travel-tips/

Homeward Bound Total Wellness

Thanksgiving for your Pets Too!

Thanksgiving is a time for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also a time for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too:

  • Talkin’ Turkey: If you decide to feed your pet a small bite of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don’t offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria. Do not give your pet the left over carcass–the bones can be problematic for the digestive tract.
  • No Bread Dough: Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him access to raw yeast bread dough. When a dog or cat ingests raw bread dough, the yeast continues to convert the sugars in the dough to carbon dioxide gas and alcohol. This can result in bloated drunken pets, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring hospitalization.
  • Don’t Let Them Eat Cake: If you plan to bake Thanksgiving desserts, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.
  • A Feast Fit for a King: While your family enjoys a special meal, give your cat and dog a small feast of their own. Offer them made-for-pets chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a food puzzle toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

A few small boneless pieces of cooked turkey, a taste of mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don’t allow your pets to overindulge, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, it’s best keep pets on their regular diets during the holidays. Please visit the ASPCA page for more info.  

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/thanksgiving-safety-tips

Homeward Bound Total Wellness

Happy Mother’s Day Pet Moms!

“Being a mother doesn’t mean being related to someone by blood. It means loving someone unconditionally and with your whole heart. ~ Anonymous

Senior Dog Care Challenges

The notion of dog years stems from the common belief that one year for a dog equals seven years for a human. Although canine aging is more nuanced than a simple formula, any dog lover knows that dogs’ lives pass far too quickly.

Even so, America’s 70 million dogs, like their human companions, are living longer, on average, because of better medical care and nutrition. Caring for elderly dogs can be heart-wrenching. Many pet owners struggle to understand when to pursue aggressive care and when to stop and help a beloved pet pass on.

“Older patients are the biggest challenge veterinarians face,” says Dr. Alicia Karas, an assistant professor of veterinary medicine at Tufts University. She argues for a holistic approach to older dogs, saying that “too often we focus on the affected body part or the results of an X-ray, not how an animal walks into the exam room.”

Pain tops the list of common health concerns for older dogs, with causes ranging from the routine, such as arthritis, to the more serious, such as cancer. As in humans, pain management can be complicated by other conditions. A dog with weak kidneys, for instance, may not be able to take canine-specific pain medicine.

Read more here http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/02/25/515610795/when-you-love-an-old-dog-managing-care-can-be-a-challenge

Homeward Bound Pet Care

www.homewardboundpets.com

281-909-7386

My Puppy is Chewing EVERYTHING!

Puppies, just like human toddlers, need a completely puppy-proof area, either a crate or gated room. If your puppy grabs a forbidden item while you are watching him, quickly distract him with a sharp “Eh eh!” and when he drops it, redirect cheerfully with a toy that he is allowed to have.

Teaching tricks is a good way to give your pup appropriate outlets. A good one to start with is “Leave it.” Follow this link to learn how.

Insufficient exercise and mental stimulation can drive your adult dog to find destructive forms of entertainment, so it’s up to you to meet his needs. If ugly winter weather keeps you inside, play indoor games with him. Fetch, hide and seek, and tug-of-war (played correctly) are great fun and exercise for both of you. Here are some good indoor game ideas to try.

There are many entertaining dog puzzles on the market, too, and you can even make your own. Just remember that many of these are meant to be enjoyed with you and not left alone with your dog.

Read more here http://www.akc.org/content/dog-training/articles/how-to-stop-chewing/?utm_source=enewsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20170227-yourakc

 

Homeward Bound Pet Care

www.homewardboundpets.com

281-909-7386