Should You Adopt a Pet From a Shelter?

 

The next time you’re in the market for a new pet and wondering where to buy a cat, dog, or other animal, try setting your sights on your local animal shelter. Despite any negative stereotypes animal shelters may have, they actually provide a ton of healthy, happy pet options for your family to take home and love.

Here are 5 things you may have heard in the past about shelter pets, and what the actual truth is.

Myth #1: Shelter pets aren’t healthy.

Truth: In fact, shelter pets can be quite healthy. In addition, many shelter pets are spayed and neutered, and some even come with location microchips.

Although there is much variety in animal shelters throughout the country, most good shelters almost always provide excellent vet care for their animals. In most shelters animals are vaccinated upon intake.

Myth #2: I won’t be able to find a pure breed at a shelter.

Truth: According to some studies approximately 25% of all dogs in shelters are purebreds. 

Myth #3: Shelter pets are unruly.

Truth: Many shelter pets receive some training and socialization before adoption to help make the transition to their new family easier.  Many volunteers visit the shelters on a regular basis to socialize and train these animals for their fur-ever home!

Myth #4: I won’t be able to properly get to know my pet from the shelter before I take her home.

Truth: Many shelters offer online pet profiles so that you can get to know the animals that are available before you even step foot in the shelter. It is always a good idea to schedule a ‘get-acquainted’ session with your prospective shelter pet and, have a list of questions you can ask the available shelter staff and the staff veterinarian. You should also try to schedule a meet n’ greet with the other animals in your household to make sure the new fur-baby is a good fit for your family.

Myth #5: All the pets in a shelter will be older.

Truth: Shelters and rescues have pets of all ages.

At the end of the day, deciding where to get your brand new family member from is a big decision, but with the right information, it can be made a bit easier.

When you adopt a pet from the shelter, it is important to immediately establish a relationship with a veterinarian to care for that new addition to your family.  In fact, your pet needs to be examined at least yearly by a vet even if it appears healthy as many diseases are hidden and not apparent.  Remember, it is much cheaper to prevent disease than it is to treat it!

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